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The Junior Science and Humanities Symposia (JSHS) Program promotes original research and experimentation in the sciences, engineering, and mathematics at the high school level and publicly recognizes students for outstanding achievement. By connecting talented students, their teachers, and research professionals at affiliated symposia and by rewarding research excellence, JSHS aims to widen the pool of trained talent prepared to conduct research and development vital to our nation.

Montana Tech is proud to host the Intermountain Region JSHS, serving the states of MT, ID, UT, CO, and NV.

 

Alexander Cheng earned the right to compete at Intel ISEF 2018 in Pittsburgh, PA by winning First Place in the
2018 Montana Tech Intermountain Junior Science and Humanities Symposium. Alexander was a Junior at Hillcrest High School, Midvale, Utah when he presented:

Automatic Detection of Intravitreal Neovascularization in Retinal Flat Mount Images.

Each year, approximately 1,800 high school students from more than 75 countries, regions, and territories are awarded the opportunity to showcase their independent research and compete for on average $5 million in prizes at Intel ISEF. The competition focuses on identifying, inspiring, and engaging the world's next STEM generation.

Alex added, “Having the IJSHS competition in the symposium style format allowed me to present your ideas in a way that other competitions do not allow. This allows me to not only explain my science project to others, but also practice public speaking and expressing ideas. IJSHS seems to be one of the few science competitions that actually allow you to do this.”

Lucy Sirrs earned the right to compete at Intel ISEF 2018 in Pittsburgh, PA by winning Second Place in the 2018 Montana Tech Intermountain Junior Science and Humanities Symposium. Lucy was a Junior at Hellgate High School, Missoula, MT when she presented:

Requirements for Aggression:
Altering EAAT1 Expression to Manipulate Glutamate Uptake in Drosophila melanogaster.

Lucy got involved in her project when took Hellgate's Advanced Problems in Science class sophomore and junior year. She worked with a mentor on a STEM project of your choice outside of class, and in class, Lucy worked on presenting it as a research paper, PowerPoint, poster, etc. and go to science fairs. She participated in Missoula's Brain Bee her freshman year and thought neuroscience seemed interesting, Lucy contacted the neuroscience faculty at the University of Montana and Sarah Certel, her current mentor and has been working in her lab since.

Lucy added, "ISEF was so much fun, especially because I never expected to go. I was so stressed leading up to the competition, but it was so rewarding to be able to say I presented for eight hours at an international fair (and getting to go to Universal Studios afterward wasn't so bad either). ISEF was a whirlwind of emotions, but it was one of the most fun weeks of my life."